Stereo Amplifiers Acworth GA

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Brandsmart USA
(770) 423-1600
3305 Busbee Drive Nw
Kennesaw, GA
 
H.H. Gregg
(770) 919-1991
2555 Cobb Place Lane
Kennesaw, GA
 
Best Buy
(770) 721-7599
1810 Cumming Hwy Suite 600
Canton, GA
 
H.H. GREGG
(770) 432-9494
2784 Cumberland Blvd.
Smyrna, GA
 
Cartunes
(404) 256-5600
5834 Roswell Road
Atlanta, GA
Services
Car Audio

Best Buy
850 Cobb Place Blvd Nw
Kennesaw, GA
 
Atlanta Audio Consultants
(770) 977-9110
3149 Hudson Pond Lane
Marietta, GA
Services
Audio / Video, Home Automation / Systems Integration / Home Networking, Home Theater, Lighting Control, Multi-Room Audio, Multi-Room Video, Security / Access Control / Surveillance / Gate Access, Telephone Systems, Home Networking, iPhone / iPad integration
Brands
Yamaha,RBH, Jamo,Elan g!, Monitor Audio, Bass, Marantz, Sharp, Niles Audio, Da-Lite, Monster Cable Liberty Cable, Lutron,Kinetics Noise,Samsung, Rockustics, Chief, Velodyne, Panasonic, RTI, Artison
Certifications
One or more employees at this company have achieved CEDIA Professional Certification status:- Phillip Ampel, CEDIA Certified Professional EST II

Georgia Home Theater
(770) 955-8909
2516 Cobb Pkwy.
Smyrna, GA
Services
Home Audio, Design & Installation

Best Buy
2460 Cobb Pkwy Se
Smyrna, GA
 
Best Buy
4145 Lavista Rd
Tucker, GA
 

pass250

POSITIVE FEEDBACK ONLINE - ISSUE 6

pass labs

X250 stereo amplifier

as reviewed by Mark Katz

pass9.jpg (35267 bytes)

Photos taken by Dave Clark in his system

   

The Pass X250 is the 2nd from the bottom of the Pass X series amp line. The smallest is the not so small X150, at 150 watts/channel and at the top are the 1000 watt per monobloc X1000 amps. These amps succeed the excellent Aleph series. The X250 weighs in at 100 pounds, but can be carried by two people with the help of the rear mounted handles. The front has a circular power switch and an attractive blue glowing meter that I believe conveys how much current the amp needs to draw. Wing-like protrusions that can be used as handles surround the meter and the whole amp has a brushed silver look. The back of this rather hefty stereo amp sports both single ended and balanced inputs and clever, large binding posts that are very easy to hand tighten. The binding posts are good for spades, but can’t be used on bananas since there’s nowhere to plug them. Also on the back is the obligatory IEC receptacle for the power cord, and the main power switch. The amp’s operation is intuitive. The manual gives the Nelson Pass design philosophy of low noise, very low distortion, achievable with only 2 stages of amplification and low global feedback using "Supersymmetry" and balanced circuitry. His discussion of distortion minimization makes good reading – in the user’s manual http://www.passlabs.com/pdf/x250man.pdf . Of course, the proof is in the implementation

pass8.jpg (36466 bytes)

I unplugged the Kora Cosmos amps and plugged the Pass X250 directly into a dedicated 20 amp outlet using a fairly hefty Tiff power cord. The rest of the system used included a CEC TL1 transport with Marigo Signature digital interconnect into an Audio Magic modified Kora Hermes 192/24 tubed DAC, Kora Eclipse tubed preamp hooked together with Goertz Triode interconnects. The amp drove the JM Labs Mezzo Utopias, a fairly flat 4 ohm, efficient load through shot-gunned (one run on each terminal) Kimber 8TC. The low powered equipment was plugged into an API Powerwedge 116 II, with the preamp into a non transformer filtered outlet. The amp changed the character of my system. Gone was the seductive sound of the Kora Cosmos, in came POWER. The first thing I noticed was a sense of the music becoming more dynamic. On my speakers, it seemed effortless and amazingly energetic. It sounded as if the dynamics of the performances were brought closer to the original. With the possible exception of very high efficiency horn speakers, dynamics of the music reproduced is markedly diminished compared to the original. Many people deride this type of speakers for poor tonal balance and a honky, "cupped hand" sound and with a few exceptions, they’re right. Despite this they can convey lively dynamics that would otherwise be far more compressed on more "audiophile approved" speakers....

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