Sony Headphones Santa Ana CA

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Audio Images (Henry''s Audio Visual Solutions)
(714) 258-7238
1582 Parkway LoopSte. F
Tustin, CA
Services
Acoustical Design, Home Automation / Systems Integration / Home Networking, Home Theater, Lighting Control, Multi-Room Audio
Certifications
One or more employees at this company have achieved CEDIA Professional Certification status:- James Anslow, CEDIA Certified Professional EST II- Larry Basham, CEDIA Certified Professional EST II- James Bower, CEDIA Certified Professional EST II- Jordan Clark, CEDIA Certified Professional EST II- Chris Corrigan, CEDIA Professional Subject Matter Expert, CEDIA Certified Professional EST III (Advanced EST), CEDIA Certified Professional EST II- Jason Crawford, CEDIA Certified Professional EST II- Ju

Digital Ear
(714) 544-7903
17602 E. 17th StreetSuite 106
Tustin, CA
Services
Home Audio, Design & Installation

Synergy
(714) 532-2048
300 El Camino Real
Tustin, CA
 
Best Buy
3741 W Chapman Ave
Orange, CA
 
Magnolia Audio Video
(714) 913-8012
901 S. Coast Drive
Costa Mesa, CA
Services
Home Audio

Paragon Home Theaters
(714) 734-8662
1100 Irvine Blvd. #323
Tustin, CA
Services
Home Automation / Systems Integration / Home Networking, Home Theater, Lighting Control, Motorized Window Treatments / Home Theater Curtains, Multi-Room Audio
Brands
Marantz, Pioneer, Panasonic, Samsung, Sharp, Polk Audio, Klipsch, Niles, Velodyne, Stewart FilmScreen, Universal Remote Control, Parasound, Escient, Nuvo, Lutron, OnQ Home and HAI.
Certifications
One or more employees at this company have achieved CEDIA Professional Certification status:- Daniel Di Maio, CEDIA Certified Professional EST II

JP Autosound
(714) 754-7700
3053 S. Harbor
Santa Ana, CA
 
Bose Factory Store
(714) 769-4080
The Block At Orange,20 City Boulevard West
Orange, CA
 
Fry\'s Electronics-Fountain Va
(714) 378-4400
10800 Kalama River Ave
Fountain Valley, CA
 
Pure Audio
(714) 530-1888
10872 Westminster Avenue #103Suite 103
Garden Grove, CA
Services
Home Audio

mdr7506

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sony

MDR-7506 headphones

as reviewed by Ed Kobesky

 

 

Winter comes early to my chunk of the planet. Maybe that's why I've been on a serious headphone bender—with a Discman and a set of cans, I can curl up in whatever wing of the house is nearest the sun. Luckily, I've had plenty of headphones to choose from lately. I recently picked up some Grado SR60s, and I'm reviewing Beyerdynamic's new DT880s. I won't make you wait for my reviews to tell you that both are outstanding, even remarkable, yet it's a set of Sony—yes, Sony—headphones that I'm recommending today. Keep reading, though, because there are some serious conditions attached.

Sony's MDR-7506 headphones are part of their Professional line, and sell for a reasonable $100 nearly everywhere (retail is $130). You'll probably recognize them as the headphones of choice for many recording studios and movie sets, but they also qualify as audiophile cans, except at home, where they leave a lot to be desired. Plugged into the headphone jack of good components, they're thin, bright, and nasty on top, with soupy bass below. HeadRoom's excellent Little headphone amp (with the optional Premium Module) laid bare their other shortcomings. The bass tightened up, yet the sound was not only lean but dull and decidedly unmusical. I was ready to chuck them until I plugged them directly into some downright lame equipment. Ta-dah! The Sonys began making music.

Why? I guess you could ask Sony, for all the good it would do. Rather than wait to hear from a 23-year-old product manager, I formulated my own answer. Here goes: The MDRs, given their role as monitoring devices, are designed to be plugged into a wide range of equipment, from expensive mixing boards to low-end handheld video cameras. Driven by good amplification, as in a recording studio, they'll be ruthlessly revealing, precisely as they should be, yet less highly resolving sources benefit from their high sensitivity. My $60 Sony portable CD player (model D-EJ368CK) is a sluggish source, as I discovered when I tried it with the HeadRoom Little and my Sennheiser HD580s, yet connected to the MDRs, it produced plenty of detail, and its wimpy output sanded off all of the overtly rough edges. I've been using this as my travel system ever since.

But aren't the Grado SR60s superior in every way? Yes, they are. Unfortunately, because they are an open-back design, they let in all kinds of outside noise—the college party in the hotel room next door, crying babies in an airline terminal, and every other nerve-shredding sound I don't want to hear when I'm on the road. Without resorting to noise-canceling circuitry, which sacrifices sound quality, the closed-back MDRs reduce much of the din, allowing me to truly relax. They're also comfortable. They surround my ears, though just barely. Folks with big heads may find that they sit on their ears, not around them, which could be a problem. They don't give B...

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